How Much Do Youtubers Make ( Complete Discussion )

How Much do YouTubers Make?


Content marketing is exploding. It makes sense, as a written article or produced video can convey more information and users actually choose to read/watch it. Companies are willing to pay content marketers, including YouTubers, big dollars to have them promote their product.

So how much do they really make? Well, let’s look first at how much companies pay them to promote a product and secondly let’s look at how much YouTube pays them to run ads.

How Much do You Pay a YouTuber to Promote Your Product. Obviously this varies widely depending on the YouTuber’s audience and the marketing objective. In general, YouTubers typically charge around $10,000 per 100,000 views. It’s difficult to predict how many views a native video will get, so that is the risk an advertiser takes.

How Much YouTube Pays YouTubers Per View. Once the YouTuber links Google AdSense to their channel, they make 68% of the ad revenue (see Google AdSense Revenue Share). YouTube charges advertisers when a viewer watches 30 seconds or more of the ad, and typically charges around $.18 per view (see How Much Do Ads on YouTube Cost). Only about 15% of viewers will be counted as a “paid view” since many of them skip.

So if you have 1,000 views to your video and 15% actually watch the ad, then you would have 150 paid views. At $.18 per view, this would equate to $27 total charged to the advertiser. As the content creator you get 68% of that, so you would average around $18 per 1,000 views.

Here is it another way:

1,000 views –> 150 views of people completing the ad

$.18 per view x 150 views = $27 charged to advertiser

$27 advertiser charge x 68% revenue share = $18 paid to content creator per 1,000 views

Who are the Top YouTubers? In 2014, the top YouTuber made $4.9 million unboxing toys. Yes that’s right, the whole channel is just her unboxing Disney toys. Her top video, Play Doh Sparkle Princess, has garnered 217 million views. Other examples include PewDiePie, which made $4 million in 2014 and LittleBabyBum, which made $3.5 million. If this makes you question everything you’ve done in your life, you’re not alone.

Should Marketers Pay YouTubers to Make Videos? To say it depends is kind of a cop-out, so I’m going to compare the cost per thousand views to if you just ran an online video ad instead.

Making Videos. From above, you could calculate that to have a YouTuber make a video and post it to their channel you would be paying roughly $10,000 for 100,000 views, which breaks down to $100 per 1,000 views.

Running Video Ads. If you opted to just run an ad on their channel, you would pay $27 per 1,000 views (but only really get 150 completed views). To get 1,000 completed views it would cost $405.

Both are good options. Video is much more visual than any other media so if you’re debating between the two you have a good problem. Having a YouTuber produce a video is comparatively less expensive, but you give up creative control and cannot know how successful the video will be. Also you are limited to just their channel, so you may need to do multiple of these deals. Some of the pros are that you get a customized piece of content that doesn’t feel like an ad, and oftentimes these channels reach audiences that don’t consume general mass media. Paid ads are just that – paid ads, and oftentimes users feel inconvenienced when forced to watch them. However, the targeting is great and can oftentimes tie into your larger marketing strategy.


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LET'S DISCOVER HOW MUCH DO YOUTUBERS MAKE ?

Making money may vary per channel. Average youtube monetization for 1000 youtube views ranges from 0.5-2 USD based on the location of viewers and target audience. The numbers vary a lot, most channels get an average of 0.5 USD per 1000 views.

This article will tell you all about how you can earn money via YouTube and how much. The fact of earning is un-doubtable. Pretty much anyone can do it, the only question is how much you can make out of it. It is really not an easy task, to get enough subscribers and viewers, in order to actually make a living out of it, or at least some pocket money.

Over time, surveys and studies have shown that making money online is a convenient way millions of people use to generate revenue by monetizing skills, opportunities or talents. Monetization of a skill means that you are converting your skill into money. If you would like to earn money by creating and uploading videos, we recommend YouTube. You will need to create engaging and interesting videos, attract a high volume of users to earn money. A good way to start your video would be an intro. There are many intro makers out there, which would help to have a high-quality intro to give your videos professional look. Here is a tutorial on how to create a great intro in several minutes for YouTube without additional knowledge.

YouTube was founded approximately 10 years and has more than 819,417,600 hours of video.

In this article, we discuss how to earn money on YouTube and share a success story.

Monetization of your YouTube Channel

To start making money on YouTube you will need to monetize your YouTube channel and associate it with an approved AdSense account to start earning. Not all videos are eligible for monetization, you must meet video monetization criteria and YouTube Advertising formats to benefit from this service. This is the direct way to earn money from YouTube videos.

One of the biggest YouTubers is Olga Kay. Recently, in the New York Times, she revealed that she earned $100k -$130k from YouTube annually over the last three years. This translates to $8,300 - $10,800 per month, which of course is good money! This makes her one of the richest YouTube users.

To maximize your revenue you will need to upload videos to YouTube that attract a high volume of traffic because you make money when someone views your video. Are wondering “how much do YouTubers make per view?” well, they on average make 0.5 -2 dollars for ever 1k video views. The secret to success is making videos that are highly appealing to viewers. YouTuber salary varies from one user to another depending on their efforts to publicize their channel.


To get more views and make more money on YouTube you need to market your videos on other sites, such as a personal blog or website and other social media or video sites. Embedding the video or sharing the link on the internet increases chances of getting noticed. Your video marketing campaing have to be defined in details.

Once you have monetized your content with a high volume of traffic, you may apply to become a YouTube partner. If granted partnership you will gain access to a large variety of content creation tools, and get an opportunity to win prizes for the number of views you have. You can apply for the membership anytime, but to get top rated partner programs, you should have accumulated 15k hours over the last 3 months.  Before making the application view YouTube channel stats to know your eligibility.

I guess you may be wondering how many YouTube subscribers you need to make money. Well, it is not really the number of subscribers that matters but the number of viewers and YouTube pay per view. However, it will be logical to argue that someone with say 10,000 subscribers has higher chances of getting 1,000 views than someone with 1,000 subscribers.  Also, advertisers only pay when subscribers click ads or watch a video for half a minute. This means if your video gets a million views but no one clicks the ads, you won’t make any money.

You need an active YouTube subscription to get more clicks which will only be possible if you post catchy content, and get a high YouTube rank that will improve aspects such as visibility when people look up YouTube.

YouTube Analytics

YouTube Analytics provides a wide range of reports and metrics for you to monitor the progress of your videos and channel. Data on a variety of YouTube stats and reports including Traffic sources, Watch time, and Demographics reports are available. You can use your computer or mobile device to view the metrics.

How much does YouTube pay? 

YouTube view statistics update you on your account’s earning, and you will only be paid if you fully comply with YouTube’s payment threshold.

Other ways to make money on YouTube

Everywhere on the internet we find information that making money on YouTube is as easy as posting videos, generating traffic, and cashing in on ad-based revenue. This is a myth because practically you cannot make steady, healthy revenue based only on YouTube money per view (ad revenue).  Realistically, you only make a few thousand dollars for a million views, and getting a million views is no simple task. You may eventually realize the need to generate revenue via other means.

Affiliate Marketing

One of the commonest opportunities for making money online is affiliate marketing, yet most affiliate marketers aren’t putting enough effort to generate enough revenue.

Just like most affiliate marketers, you may be using static blogs to drive traffic to affiliate links, but you can supplement this with a lively YouTube channel that you can use as a primary catalyst. The internet is gradually moving toward video as the major form of content, and taking this step will put you ahead of time as you will begin benefitting now.

Other than ad revenue, other ways to make money on YouTube include attracting sponsorships and transitioning into live speaking engagements.

How do YouTubers get paid?

Then how do you get paid on YouTube? Well, no withdrawal options are provided in AdSense and anytime you have more than your minimum threshold (usually $100), the money will be paid directly to your bank account on a monthly basis. In a few countries AdSense issues checks but they do direct deposits for most of the supported countries.

There are still plenty of skeptical people in this world who do not believe that it is possible to make money on the Internet.  Calculating how much a YouTube creator makes annually is no simple feat.

Here is a list of the top 10 richest YouTubers in the world in 2017

10. Hank Green
Hank Green is the famous YouTubers who run Vlogbrothers YouTube channel.  He and his brother are currently working on the same YouTube channel. Currently, Hank net worth is $2 million.

9. Lilly Singh
Lilly Singh is Canadian YouTube Personality, vlogger, comedian, actress, and writer. She starts making YouTube videos in October 2010.  She got her silver play button on 2012, after 2 years od making the YouTube channel. In her second channel, she uploads Behind the scenes footage and her daily activities. Her Net Worth is about $2.5 Million.

8. Rosanna Pansino
Rosanna Pansino is the American baker, actress, and YouTuber.  She currently has over 8 million subscribers. Her Net- worth is about $2.9 million. Rosanna had uploaded more than 100 videos as part of her Nerdy Nummies Series.

7. Jenna Marbles
Jenna Marbles is an American YouTube Personality, Vlogger, Comedian, and Actress. After just 1 year of launching the YouTube channel, she makes the video ” How to trick people into thinking you are good looking” which quickly went viral within few days. She has over 19 million subscribers and her net worth is about $2.9 million.

6. Roman Atwood
He is American YouTube Personality, Comedian, Vlogger, and prankster.  His vlogging channel name is ” RomanAtwoodVlogs’ and had more than 12 millions subscribers. Roman is the second person to receive two diamond play buttons. His net worth is about $4.5 million.

5. Grace Helbig
Grace Helbig is an American comedian, YouTube, Actress, Producer, and Author. She Started her YouTube journey on 2007, in attempts to keep her entertained by recording daily vlogs while sitting in the house with her family. Now she has over 3,000,000 subscribers. Grace Helbig Video had been watched more than 260,000,000 times. Her Net-Worth is $5 million.

4. Markiplier
Mark Edward Fischbach is an American YouTuber known as Markiplier on the internet. His channel is the 22nd most subscribed channel on YouTube. He Starts making youtube videos on 2012. Aside from his let’s play series, Markiplier also uploads various other comedy videos and vlogs. His net-Worth is $5.1 Million.

3. Smosh
Smosh is currently a YouTube channel that consists of two individuals – Ian Andrew Hecon And Daniel Anthony Padilla. They have currently 6,447,900,500 total video views and their net worth is about $12 Million.

2. Pewdiepie
Pewdiepie whose real name is Felix Arvid Ulf Kjellberg is popular for his gameplay videos and vlogs.  He is the only YouTuber with The Ruby play button. Pewdiepie starts YouTube channel on 2010 and left university degree to start playing the game and making videos. He Donated Over millions of dollars for various charitable causes over the years. He net- worth is $18 million.

1. Michelle Phan
Michelle Phan is an American make-up demonstrator and entrepreneur who become famous on YouTube by her make-up channel. Phan Starts her YouTube channel in 2007. Her Success on YouTube has also led her to embark on various business endeavors- for instance, her monthly beauty product subscription service and her own line of cosmetics. Her net- worth is $50 million.

Don't you want to try? :)


How Much do YouTubers Make? – A YouTuber’s Pocket Guide [Calculator]

There are still plenty of skeptical people in this world who do not believe that it is possible to make money on the Internet. In reality, there are numerous success stories of people who have made their fortune online. YouTube is just one of many ways you can become an Internet sensation, and if you are lucky an Internet millionaire.

So just How Much do YouTubers Make?

Google pays out 68% of their AdSense revenue, so for every $100 an advertiser pays, Google pays $68 to the publisher. The actual rates an advertiser pays varies, usually between $0.10 to $0.30 per view, but averages out at $0.18 per view. On Average the YouTube channel can receive $18 per 1,000 ad views. This equates to $3 - $5 per 1000 video views.

In this post we discussed how people make money on YouTube. However, just how much do they make? Well here's a Youtube Earnings Estimator you can give a spin - to find out how much Youtubers make exactly, read on;


Of course, for thousands of YouTubers, the answer is “nothing,” or “very little.” However, there are many YouTubers who make a comfortable living off their video channels. Moreover, of course, there is a small elite group who make an extraordinary income from the videos they create and post online.

When it comes to earning a YouTube income success breeds success. You will find that the hardest dollar to earn is your first. The more subscribers you have, the more people will click on your ads. The more people click on your ads, the more you make a name for yourself, the higher the likelihood of brands offering you sponsorship or merchandise deals. The better known your channel becomes, the greater your chance of joining a multi-channel network. It is like being on a giant upwards-climbing spiral.

What Can You Earn In Your Channel’s Early Days?
You are unlikely to be earning anything as you place your first video on YouTube. You are a video fledgling, and certainly a long way from being considered an influencer. However, everyone has to start at the bottom. Even PewDiePie was an unknown uploading his first video in 2010. He is now so famous that people make videos interviewing PewDiePie’s early subscribers, about whether they feel famous. Back at the beginning, he was still making niche videos in Swedish.

In theory, you can sign up for an Adsense account and enable your channel for monetization from the moment you create a YouTube channel. However, in practice, you are unlikely to make any real money until you have built up traffic to your site - and by that, I mean genuine traffic from people who watch your videos, not by taking the shortcut method of paying for views.

Although there are some adverts that are CPM (cost per thousand views), many are CPC (cost per click). For you to earn anything from a CPC ad, you need a viewer to click on the ad. In reality, only a small percentage of your viewers will click on the ads surrounding your videos. Even the CPM ads in the video itself require more than just a cursory glance. For it to be counted for payment, a viewer must watch them for at least 30 seconds (or half the ad for a very short video). Think how many people skip past the ad at the start of a video, thus wiping out any chance of payment to the channel. If viewers do click on or view your ads for long enough to earn income, you share any advertising revenue with YouTube. You will only get paid once your AdSense account reaches $100.
In your channel’s early days you are building up a reputation rather than an income.
One area you might start to make money with a relatively small number of subscribers is if you pick a popular topic and participate in affiliate marketing. For instance, if your videos review a popular type of product, and you link to an affiliate sales page for that product you may begin to earn money that way.

For a rough idea of how much Youtubers make use the earnings estimator below and import the user's Youtube channel


Of course some niches are easier than others to make money in, so if you are hoping to one day live off your channel’s proceeds it would probably help if you created your channel in a topic that interests people. Probably the most successful niche is gaming. Let’s face it, gaming is a huge industry in itself, and many gamers have reasonable levels of discretionary income to spend. Other successful niches include:
  • Lifehacks
  • Celebrity gossip
  • News
  • Top [X] Lists
  • Compilations of people’s fails (including amateur Jackass antics)
  • Food reviews and kitchen hacks
  • Product unwrapping and opening (particularly kids’ toys)
  • How to demonstrations
  • Animal activities, e.g. funny things your cats do
  • Spoofs

Moderately Successful Channels
With enough perseverance, not to mention on-camera talent, you should eventually pull yourself out of YouTube’s graveyard of poor performers. You should by this point be receiving some AdSense revenue every month, with affiliate marketing income too if you have chosen to go down that track.

However, at this stage, you are still mainly producing videos for love, with some other source of income paying your daily survival bills. By now you could be considered a minor influencer in your particular niche.

Once you have something like 20,000 subscribers, you might think about asking for crowdfunding assistance through a site like Patreon. The average Patreon contributor donates $7, with Patreon keeping 5% of pledges as a commission. It must be remembered, however, that if you are uploading videos on a regular basis, you are likely to receive recurring payments from your Patreon supporters. One example is The Comedy Button who currently has 5,266 patrons paying them $13,129 per month. This is a YouTube channel that has around 24,500 subscribers.

Once these channels begin to recognize success, they should be looking to do more with their AdWords, for instance deliberately chasing phrases with a relatively high cost per click (CPC). If they are a review channel, for instance, you could focus on reviewing products that attract ads with a higher CPC.

By now they could be famous enough for smaller brands to be asking the channel to endorse their products. Yet, these channels are still small, by YouTube’s standards, so income earned from sponsorship and product placement will still not be enough for the channel holders to live off.

Indeed, as Gaby Dunn writes about on Fusion, the middle years of a YouTube channel’s life are often the most difficult. The channel owners often need to work full time creating video content, but people only see them as mildly influential, and the channels certainly aren’t generating a full-time income. Dunn operates a channel with a friend, Just Between Us,  which currently has 728,866 subscribers. You would think that would be enough to ensure financial survival. Yet, Dunn says that “despite this success, we’re just barely scraping by…but it’s not enough to live, and its influx is unpredictable. Our channel exists in that YouTube no-man’s-land: Brands think we’re too small to sponsor, but fans think we’re too big for donations. ”

Of course, it depends on who your audience is. One issue faced by quite a few YouTubers is that their supporters are naturally anti-establishment, anti-capitalist, and anti the idea that their YouTube heroes might be selling themselves out. Other types of channels, such as the review channels, the gaming channels, and of course anything business-related have it easier. Their fans expect these channels to make money, so don’t resist helping them out.

Success Begins at 1,000,000
Once a YouTube channel’s subscriber-count reaches the millions, life becomes easier for the owners. These channels are beginning to find fame and begin to become recognized as being influential in their niche.

1,000,000 subscribers sounds quite a few, but these channels are still not in elite company. There are now over 2,000 channels in the 1,000,000 + club. Some of these are official channels for offline superstars, particularly official music channels for the likes of Justin Bieber and Rihanna, but quite a few are simply everyday people who have built themselves a YouTube following.

Once you have a following of this size, you have the traffic to earn acceptable money.
Google pays out 68% of their AdSense revenue, so for every $100 an advertiser pays, Google pays $68 to the publisher. The actual rates an advertiser pays varies, usually between $0.10 to $0.30 per view, but averages out at $0.18 per view. Around 15% of viewers on average watch the requisite 30 seconds of a video ad to count for payment. This means that for 1,000 views, 150 people are likely to watch an ad. At $0.18 per view, Google will charge the advertiser $27, keeping 32% ($9) themselves. The YouTube channel will receive $18 per 1,000 views.
Obviously, it is important for a channel to keep coming up with new videos, at least one to two videos per week. If a channel were able to get its entire fanbase of 1,000,000 to watch two new videos per week it would receive each week: $18 x 1,000 x 2 = $36,000 per week from AdSense alone.

Clearly, by this level a channel is also likely to have sponsorship opportunities, endorsements, and product placements. Many of these YouTube stars will also be well enough known that they can merchandise products to their fanbase, Any review-type channels of this size will often make good money with affiliate marketing, even if they are only tied in with Amazon, and their comparatively low 1 - 10% advertising payment rates to affiliates.

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