Hard-Boiled Eggs 101

The Easter countdown has begun. Easter time is full of family gatherings which often include bunnies, baskets and of course, eggs and egg dyeing. The American Egg Board says the average person ate 24 eggs in 2017. Patch checked with the experts for a few easy tips to help you make perfect hard-boiled eggs this season.

Popular California Chef Michele Wieser shares her preferred hard-boiling technique:

Put eggs (white or brown) in pot and cover with water.

Add a tablespoon of baking soda to water.

Put stove on high until water starts to boil and then start your timer for 13 minutes.

Remove eggs from pot and immediately place in ice water bath until cool enough to peel.

Voila! Egg-ceptional hard-boiled eggs!

Fresh eggs may preferable in omelets but not for hard-boiled eggs. To make eggs easier to peel, the Egg Council recommends using eggs that are about 7 to 10 days old when hard boiling. Run them under cold water when peeling.

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The Foolproof Guide to Cooking Eggs — Scrambled, Fried, Hard-Boiled, and More

Deviled eggs are devily delicious.

There are three particular pantry staples that you know you’ll always have on hand: milk, bread, and eggs. These simple ingredients are staples in so many dishes and necessary for every kitchen, and thus, they often get overlooked. But, the humble egg is so versatile, so packed with protein, and so delicious on its own that it really can be the star of any meal.

To embrace this common ingredient and help you use all of those leftover Easter eggs, we reached out to our Culinary Content Network of food bloggers to see what recipes would be in their guide to cooking eggs.

Like a carton of eggs, we have a dozen recipes here for you. From a zesty, funky deviled egg recipe to a classic French omelette to mini egg muffins you can take on the go, there’s an egg-cellent egg dish in here for every type of home cook and for every meal.


‘Egg’celent advice: What to do with leftover Easter eggs

Easter is Sunday, and most of you are probably hard boiling some eggs to dye and hide for the big hunts. After the fun, what do you do with the dozens of hard boiled eggs you have left.
  • The tradition of eating eggs on Easter began back in the 13th century. Way back when, eggs were a common food that people would give up for Lent. They would then celebrate eating eggs again by decorating the shells!
  • You can decorate Easter eggs with watercolors, vinegar dying kits, or even Kool-Aid!
  • The Easter egg is said to symbolize joy, celebration, and new life.
  • What do you do with all those decorated eggs once Easter is over? Make this delicious, healthy, avocado egg salad. Explain recipe and mention that it is filled with nutrients using NestFresh eggs.
  • The tradition of eating eggs on Easter began back in the 13th century. Way back when, eggs were a common food that people would give up for Lent.
  • They would then celebrate eating eggs again by decorating the shells!
  • You can decorate Easter eggs with watercolors, vinegar dying kits, or even Kool-Aid!
  • The Easter egg is said to symbolize joy, celebration, and new life.
  • What do you do with all those decorated eggs once Easter is over? Make this delicious, healthy, avocado egg salad.

Mise en Place

6 Eggs hard boiled **see recipe** (Eggs to be split between the dressing, salad, and garnish) separate yolk from whites
1/2 Avocado
1 c Frisée pale yellow parts only
1/2 Beef Steak or Heirloom tomato diced
1/2 Small Red Onion shaved and pickled **see recipe**
0.1 z Chive batonette
0.1 z Parsley Picked leaves
3-5 Thinly Shaved Medallions of Capocollo
1/4 c + 1/8 c Seasoned Rice Wine Vinegar (will be split between dressing and pickling brine for onions)
1/2 t Dijon Mustard
1 T Lemon Oil (may be substituted with a high quality extra virgin olive oil)
1 clove Garlic
2 slices Preserved Lemon (may be substituted with the rind and juice of 1 lemon), (will be shared between the dressing and garnish)
Sea Salt
Freshly Ground Pepper

For the Boiled Eggs

6 whole Eggs straight out of the refridgerator
1 large bowl filled with ice water

Preparation:

Place Eggs in sauce pan and cover with water. Water level should be approximately 1 inch above the eggs. On medium high heat, bring the water and eggs to a boil. Remove from heat, cover, and let cook for 13.5 minutes. Remove eggs and immediately place in the ice water. Place Eggs and ice water in refrigerator. Let Eggs chill for 20 minutes before peeling.
For the Pickled Red Onions:

1/2 Red Onion shaved paper thin
1/8 c Seasoned Rice Wine Vinegar
1 dash Sea Salt

Preparation:

Shave the Red Onion and toss with the Rice Wine Vinegar and Sea Salt. Let the onions macerate for at least 15 minutes before using.

For the Dressing:

2-3 Egg Yolks hard boiled
1 clove Garlic
1 piece Preserved Lemon (may be substituted with the rind and juice from 1 lemon and 1 T turbinado sugar)
1/4 c Seasoned Rice Wine Vinegar
1 T Lemon Infused Olive Oil ( may be substituted for high quality Extra Virgin Olive Oil)
1/2 t Dijon Mustard
Salt and Pepper to taste

Preparation:

Place the Egg Yolk, Vinegar, Garlic, Mustard, and Lemon in a food processor and liquify. Slowly add the Lemon Oil (or Extra Virgin Olive Oil) allowing the sauce to emulsify. You may add 1-2 T of cold water to aid in the emulsification. Season the dressing with Sea Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper to your preference.

For The Salad:

6 Egg Whites hard boiled and chopped **see recipe**
4 Egg Yolks hard boiled and crumbled **see recipe**
1/2 Tomato (beefsteak or heirloom) concasee
0.1 z Chives chopped
0.1 z Parsley Leaves whole, cleaned, and picked from the stem
2 z Pickled Red Onion **see recipe**
1/2 c Frisée pale yellow parts only, cleaned and dried
3-5 Thinly Shaved pieces of Capocollo
5 Pretzel Chips
3 z Dressing **see recipe**
1 slice Preserved Lemon
1/2 Avocado chopped
Sea Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper to taste

Preparation:

Gently toss all ingredients excluding the Herbs, Capocollo, Lemon, and Pretzels. Season to taste, then garnish with remaining ingredients.

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