Demi Lovato Says She Used to Only Have Male Friends

As it turns out, Demi Lovato has quite a bit in common with her Smurfs: The Lost Village character, Smurfette — and not necessarily in any way you'd expect.

In a recent interview with Mamamia, the singer and actress revealed that at the start of her career, she only had male friends, in part because she made a conscious effort to surround herself with men instead of women.

"In my work environment, I used to only surround myself with men," she said. "I only had guys in my band, and I toured with guys and my tour manager was a guy and this and that."

After a while, however, Demi began to reevaluate why she was actively keeping women out of her life, and became resolved to change her way of thinking.

"I made a specific change. There was a time I used to say that I just didn't get along with girls," she said. "I reevaluated why I didn't get along with girls, and I think it's because I didn't really have any in my life that I trusted."

"Now I've made it a point to surround myself with strong women and it's really made a difference in my life," she continued.

The star added that she couldn't be happier to have befriended so many empowering women over the years, and that she views them as "role models and positive influences." But nonetheless, she does still feel a very special connection to Smurfette, because she very much understands what it means to be the only girl in a universe of boys.

"I really relate to Smurfette, because I was the only female for a little bit [in my world]," she said. "I had to make changes in my life to surround myself with influences and people that I could relate to. I’m really grateful that I did."

Smurfs: The Lost Village is in theaters now.

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Demi Lovato: 'I don't have a thigh gap and I'm still beautiful'

"I don't have a thigh gap and I'm still beautiful the way I am," Lovato, a longtime body positivity proponent, wrote.

Lovato added the hashtags #recovery #selflove and #EVERYbodyisbeautiful.

It's not the first time Lovato shared her feelings about the thigh gap craze.

The star, who's talked publicly about her struggles with eating disorders, bipolar disorder and addiction, shared a similar pic and message in 2015.

"Regardless of what society tells you these days... You don't have to have a thigh gap to be beautiful," she wrote. "It is possible to love your body the way it is."

Lovato told Allure last year that not everyone understands why she talks so much about body positivity.

"I'll have people who are like, 'Stop talking about eating disorders. Like, we get it. You struggled. Now shut up,'" said the star.

But once she started feeling better about herself, she wanted others to as well.

"I've never felt as confident in my skin as I do today," Lovato said. "A year ago, on tour, almost every inch of my body was covered by clothing. ... Once I started feeling better about myself, I felt better about showing more skin."

Thigh gap or not!


'I didn't trust them': Demi Lovato opens up about not having any female friends at the start of her career

She's known for her bubbly personality and catchy pop tunes.

Now Demi Lovato, 24, has opened up about her struggle with making female friends when her career started to boom.

Speaking with Mamamia, Demi's confession resonated with teenage girls about the battle of trusting young women as she started to catch the public's attention.

While promoting her role in the new animated film Smurfs: The Lost Village, the singer and actress said she spent the first few years of her blossoming career surrounding herself with male friends.

She said: 'In my work environment, I used to only surround myself with men.'

'I only had guys in my band, and I toured with guys and my tour manager was a guy and this and that.'

After years of having only male friends to lean on, Demi said she made a conscious decision to have more empowering women in her life.

She said: 'I made a specific change. There was a time I used to say that I just didn't get along with girls.'
'I reevaluated why I didn't get along with girls, and I think it's because I didn't really have any in my life that I trusted.'

She went on to say that she is now surrounded by strong women and 'it's really made a difference' in the way she lives her life.

Demi said she sees her friends as powerful, positive role models and now has women in her life that she can turn to for 'questions and advice'.

Demi relates to her character Smurfette in the new film as she is the only female in a town full of boys and goes on a journey of self-discovery to find her true friends and her place in the world.

She said: "I really relate to Smurfette, because I was the only female for a little bit [in my world]."

"I had to make changes in my life to surround myself with influences and people that I could relate to and I’m really grateful that I did."

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