The White House’s estimate of coverage losses under the GOP’s health care plan is even larger than the CBO

The White House ran an internal examination of the potential impacts of the American Health Care Act and found that the number of Americans who would be uninsured within 10 years could actually be closer to 26 million, not the 24 million projected by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO).

Politico viewed a document outlining the White House’s projections on Monday.

The White House’s specific estimates break down to: 17 million people losing Medicaid coverage, six million people losing coverage in the individual market, and three million losing coverage in employer-based plans, Politico reported.

By 2026, the total number of uninsured Americans will be around 54 million. That number is nearly double the projections under the Affordable Care Act better known as Obamacare.

Business Insider’s Bob Bryan broke down the specifics of the CBO’s report on the American Health Care Act’s impacts. The nonpartisan agency’s assessment released on Monday estimated that as many as 24 million more people would be uninsured under the GOP’s replacement for Obamacare and that the federal budget deficit would shrink by more than $300 billion over the next decade.

REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price (C) and Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini (R) listen to U.S. President Donald Trump speak during a meeting with health insurance company CEOs at the White House in Washington, U.S. February 27, 2017.


Trump administration disagrees with CBO report on health care

The Trump administration on Monday lashed out at the Congressional Budget Office’s report that estimated that about 24 million more Americans in a few years would be uninsured under the new legislation.

The bill, called the American Health Care Act, would be “less generous” with new tax credits for those receiving subsidies under the current law and the plan would likely increase average premiums in the nongroup market until 2020.

Tom Price, the Health and Human Services secretary, downplayed the report and said, “we disagree strenuously with the report that was put out. It’s just not believable is what we would suggest.”

The CBO report, compiled along with staff of the Joint Committee on Taxation, also determined that the Republicans’ American Health Care Act would save money for taxpayers. According to the study, it would reduce federal deficits by $337 billion from 2017 to 2026.

The report’s estimate on the number of uninsured nevertheless could overshadow projections about premiums and taxpayer savings, fueling critics. Criticism so far has come from Democrats, Republicans from states that benefit from Obama's law and many corners of the health-care industry.

According to the CBO, the projected loss in insurance coverage is related mostly to a provision repealing penalties associated with the ACA’s requirement to buy insurance.

The CBO report, compiled along with staff of the Joint Committee on Taxation, also determined that the Republicans’ American Health Care Act would save money for taxpayers. According to the study, it would reduce federal deficits by $337 billion from 2017 to 2026.

The report’s estimate on the number of uninsured nevertheless could overshadow projections about premiums and taxpayer savings, fueling critics. Criticism so far has come from Democrats, Republicans from states that benefit from Obama's law and many corners of the health-care industry.

According to the CBO, the projected loss in insurance coverage is related mostly to a provision repealing penalties associated with the ACA’s requirement to buy insurance.

“Obamacare all of a sudden the last couple of weeks is getting a false rep that maybe it’s OK. It’s not OK,” President Trump said Monday, according to Politico. “It’s a disaster, and people understand that. It’s failed, and it’s imploding. And if we let it go for another year, it’ll totally implode. In fact, I’ve told the Republicans, ‘Why don’t you just let it go for another year?’ That way everybody will really understand how bad it is.”


CBO: Defunding Planned Parenthood would lead to thousands more births

A congressional plan to make Planned Parenthood ineligible for federal funding would leave many women without services to help them avoid pregnancy, resulting in thousands of additional births, according to a new federal budget analysis.

The prediction came Monday as part of a much-awaited analysis from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, which assesses the fiscal impact of major legislative bills. It was part of a more sweeping look at a congressional health care bill that would repeal and replace the law known as Obamacare.

The analysts estimated that excluding the women’s health organization from the Medicaid program for one year, as congressional Republicans have proposed, would particularly affect low-income areas and communities without many health care options, leaving 15 percent of those people “without services that help women avert pregnancy.”

Planned Parenthood provides reproductive and other services, including abortion, to 2.5 million men and women nationally.

The reduction in services would reduce federal spending on Medicaid, the state-federal program for the poor, by $178 million during 2017, the analysts estimate. But they believe the savings would be partially offset by the fact that there would be “several thousand” more births paid for under Medicaid, which already picks up the costs of about 45 percent of all U.S. births; many of those new babies likely would qualify for the Medicaid program.

Congressional Republicans and President Trump have pledged to try to defund the organization, making it ineligible for federal grants and barring Medicaid patients from getting their care there. They object to the organization’s role as the nation’s largest abortion provider and a vocal proponent of abortion rights.

But the organization has mounted an aggressive push to persuade Congress not to cut it off from Medicaid and federal grants, which make up more than 40 percent of its $1.3 billion annual budget.

0 Response to "The White House’s estimate of coverage losses under the GOP’s health care plan is even larger than the CBO"