Laverne Cox told everyone to Google Gavin Grimm

Actress Laverne Cox was there to introduce Lady Gaga and Metallica. But first, she had a message:

“Everyone please Google Gavin Grimm,” she said. “He’s going to the Supreme Court in March.”

The Post’s Moriah Balingit wrote about Grimm in August 2016, just after his local school board asked the Supreme Court to take his case over bathroom access. “The case has made Grimm, an introspective teen who once was painfully shy, the standard-bearer in the fight for transgender student rights. He approaches the role with a mixture of pride and apprehension,” the story reads.

From that story:

There was nothing remarkable about Gavin Grimm’s first trip to the boys’ bathroom at Gloucester High School. It was a little more than a month into his sophomore year, when the transgender teenager had begun quietly reintroducing himself to the student body as a boy.

Grimm had used men’s restrooms at restaurants, stores and the local amusement park, and using the boys’ bathroom at his school felt like “the natural progression of things,” he said. Just like cutting his hair short, just like wearing baggy pants and graphic T-shirts, just like beginning testosterone shots. He started using the boys’ bathroom shortly after he got word from Principal Nate Collins that it would be okay.

“I went in, went out, same deal as always,” Grimm said. “It was like, ‘Okay, great — I can use the bathroom now.’ ”


But that decision to use the boys’ bathroom one fall day in 2014 clashed with this town’s sensibilities and led to an acrimonious public debate. Now, Grimm’s case has made this quiet, out-of-the-way community in Virginia’s Tidewater region the unlikely center of the national debate over how public schools should accommodate transgender students.

Q-Tip of A Tribe Called Quest. (Kevin Winter / AFP/Getty)

Who is Anderson .Paak?

He’s a California singer-rapper who dropped his 2016 album “Malibu” after collaborating with West coast rap royals Kendrick Lamar and Dr. Dre.

Why is he here?

He’s up against Maren Morris, Chance the Rapper, Kelsea Ballerini and the Chainsmokers for best new artist.

Song you might recognize:

Paak’s solo singles have never charted. But check out “Come Down.”


Anderson .Paak teams with A Tribe Called Quest to perform medley, and Busta Rhymes blasts Donald Trump

Among the many inspiring artists who passed in 2016, the rapper Phife Dawg's death hit the hip-hop community hard. As co-founder of A Tribe Called Quest, he helped create classics of the genre including "People's Instinctive Travels and the Paths of Rhythm," "Midnight Marauders" and "The Low End Theory."

The group issued its swan song, "We Got It From Here ... Thank You for Your Service" in 2016, and its co-founders Ali Shaheed Muhammad and Q-Tip landed on stage with Busta Rhymes and best new artist nominee Anderson .Paak.

In introducing the tribute, Q-Tip gestured toward an empty microphone and dedicated the performance to Phife.

Anderson .Paak sang and played drums, but it was the roar of Busta Rhymes that made the biggest impression. Decrying "President Agent Orange," he and the others crashed through a makeshift wall and a mass of immigrants moved onto the stage and down the aisles.

Said Rhymes: "I just want to thank President Agent Orange for perpetuating all of the evil you been perpetuating throughout the United States. I want to thank President Agent Orange for [inaudible] and the Muslim ban."

The tribute featured the older Tribe tracks "Movin' Backwards" and "Award Tour" but focused on the new track "We the People." A timely song, particularly in light of recent changes to U.S. immigration policies, its chorus jumped out of the speakers:

"All the black folks, you must go/ All the Mexicans, you must go/ All the poor folks, you must go/ Muslims and gays, we hate your ways/ See all you bad folks you must go."

At the end with the people alongside him onstage, Q-Tip screamed, "Resist! Resist! Resist!"

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