Jazz Legend Al Jarreau Dead at 76

Just days after announcing that he was retiring from touring after being hospitalized for exhaustion, legendary jazz singer Al Jarreau passed away Sunday morning in Los Angeles.

The singer’s manager, Joe Gordon, released a statement–which was shared with EBONY by reporter Darlene Hill–about the singer’s death.
Dear friends, family and colleagues,

Al Jarreau passed away this morning, at about 5:30am LA time. He was in the hospital, kept comfortable by Ryan, Susan, and a few of his family and friends.

Ryan and Susan will hold a small, private service at home, for immediate family only. No public service is planned yet, but I will inform you if that changes.

Ryan asks that no flowers or gifts are send to their home or office. Instead, if you are motivated to do so, please make a contribution to the Wisconsin Foundation for School Music, a wonderful organization which supports music opportunities, teachers, and scholarships for students in Milwaukee and throughout Wisconsin. A donation page is here. Even if you do not plan to contribute, please list that page and give yourself a few minutes to watch a beautiful tribute video that Wisconsin Public Television produced to honor Al when he received his lifetime achievement award in October.

Born and raised in Milwaukee, Jarreau’s unique singing style helped to make him one of jazz’s greatest vocalists. During college, where he received a Bachelors of Arts in Psychology, Jarreau performed with a local group called The Indigos before moving to San Francisco. There he hooked up with fellow jazz great George Duke to form a trio.

Inspired to pursue music full time, Jarreau moved south to Los Angeles, where he caught the eye of Warner Bros. talent scouts, who signed the singer to a recording contract. In Los Angeles, Jarreau’s career would take off after the release of his critically acclaimed debut album We Got By. In 1977, Jarreau would win his first of seven Grammy Awards for his live album, Look to the Rainbow.

Dubbed “the voice of versatility” by the Chicago Tribune, Jarreau released 16 studio albums, a host of live albums, and several compilations. The consummate performer, Jarreau constantly toured the world, dazzling audiences with his magical voice.

Jarreau passed away at a Los Angeles hospital early Sunday morning. The singer leaves behind his wife, Susan, and his son, Ryan. He was 76.

performs during the 62nd edition of the Sanremo Song Festival, in Sanremo, Italy, Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

Singer Al Jarreau Dead At 76

Al Jarreau, the voice behind several hits and the winner of seven Grammy Awards, died early Sunday morning. He was 76.

Jarreau’s death was announced on his official website Sunday and confirmed to The Huffington Post by his representative, who said Jarreau was in the hospital surrounded by family and friends when he died.

The singer had been recently hospitalized in Los Angeles due to exhaustion, forcing him to cancel upcoming tour dates and retire from the road.

Critics praised Jarreau for his musical range over the years. The Chicago Tribune called him “the voice of versatility,” and the Detroit News described him as “one of the world’s greatest natural resources.”

Jarreau was born March 12, 1940, in Milwaukee. He sang for fun growing up and didn’t pursue music seriously until after college. He graduated from Ripon College with a psychology degree  in 1962 and earned a master’s degree in vocational rehabilitation from the University of Iowa.

His love for music would eventually take over. While in San Francisco in the 1960s, Jarreau started performing at jazz clubs. He went on to team up with George Duke to form a jazz trio. Jarreau’s talent and passion for music grew, allowing him to branch out to Los Angeles and New York, where he performed at major clubs and gained more exposure with national television appearances.

He had signed a recording contract with Warner Bros. by 1975, and released his debut album, “We Got By,” that same year. Two years later, Jarreau experienced a career breakthrough with the release of “Look to the Rainbow,” a double live album that earned him a Grammy for Best Jazz Vocal Performance.

He saw success over the years with the singles “After All,” “Breakin’ Away,” “Boogie Down” and “Trouble in Paradise,” among others.

Aside from music, Jarreau dabbled in acting both onstage and on the small screen. He had a three-month stint on Broadway in “Grease” and made guest appearances on “New York Undercover,” Touched By An Angel” and “American Idol.” He also wrote the theme song to the TV series “Moonlighting,” which ran from 1985 to 1989.

Jarreau kept up an active recording and touring schedule for five decades, remaining passionate about performing live and his fans.

“That’s the most valuable part of it, that communion with people, that communion we make when we sing together,” Jarreau told JazzTimes.com last year. “When I play, you stomp your feet or you dance. When we sing this little chorus together, when we laugh and tell this funny little story together.”

Just last week, his rep announced that Jarreau would be reluctantly retiring from touring: “With complete sorrow, Al Jarreau must retire from touring. He is thankful for his 50 years traveling the world in ministry through music ― and for everyone who shared this with him ― his faithful audience, the dedicated musicians, and so many others who have supported his effort.”

Jarreau is survived by his wife, Susan, and son, Ryan.


Al Jarreau, Singer Who Spanned Jazz, Pop and R&B Worlds, Dies at 76

Al Jarreau, a versatile vocalist who sold millions of records and won a string of Grammys for his work in pop and R&B as well as his first love, jazz, died on Sunday in Los Angeles. He was 76.

His death was announced by his manager, Joe Gordon, who said that Mr. Jarreau had been hospitalized for exhaustion two weeks ago. On the advice of his doctors, he had canceled his tour dates and retired from touring.

Mr. Jarreau did not begin a full-time musical career until he was nearly 30, but within a few years he had begun attracting notice for a vocal style that was both instantly appealing and highly unusual. Critics were particularly taken by his improvisational dexterity, in particular his virtuosic ability to produce an array of vocalizations ranging from delicious nonsense to clicks and growls to quasi-instrumental sounds.

Although he made his initial mark in the jazz world, Mr. Jarreau’s style, and his audience, crossed stylistic barriers. His music incorporated elements of pop, soul, gospel, Latin and other genres. It was a mark of his eclecticism that he won six Grammys across three different categories: jazz, pop and R&B. He was also among the performers on a Grammy-winning children’s album, “In Harmony: A Sesame Street Record.”

If Mr. Jarreau’s highly accessible, intensely personal style defied easy classification, that very accessibility — and, perhaps, the mere fact of his considerable commercial success — left some jazz purists skeptical.

Reviewing a concert by Mr. Jarreau at the Savoy in New York in 1981, Stephen Holden of The New York Times encapsulated what many saw as both the pros and the cons of Mr. Jarreau’s singular style:

“Al Jarreau may be the most technically gifted singer working in jazz-fusion today,” Mr. Holden wrote. Of the evening’s performance, however, he continued: “Mr. Jarreau’s concert lacked the emotional range of great jazz. He is such a prodigious talent that the absence of even the slightest blues inflections kept his music from cutting deeply.”

But critics’ reservations never deterred Mr. Jarreau, who prided himself, as he told The Los Angeles Times in 1986, on his “jazz attitude,” which he defined as “the idea of being open to each and every moment as a chance to create something different.”

“I try to be receptive,” he added, “and to be listening, and to not be afraid to try something new.”

Alwin Lopez Jarreau was born in Milwaukee on March 12, 1940, into a musical family. His father, a minister, was a fine singer; his mother played the piano in church. Young Al began singing at 4, harmonizing with his siblings. As a youth he sang in church, as well as with street-corner harmony groups and local jazz bands.

Mr. Jarreau earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Ripon College in Wisconsin in 1962, and a master’s in vocational rehabilitation from the University of Iowa in 1964. Afterward he moved to San Francisco, where he worked as a rehabilitation counselor for people with disabilities.

But Mr. Jarreau found he could not resist the pull of jazz and before long was singing in local nightclubs. By the late ’60s, he had quit his day job and embarked on a nightclub career, first on the West Coast and eventually in New York.

He reached a national audience with the album “We Got By,” released by Warner Bros. in 1975 to critical praise and commercial success.

Though advertised as his debut, it was actually his second album. A decade earlier, Mr. Jarreau had quietly recorded an album, later released on the Bainbridge label under the title “1965.” Though Mr. Jarreau took legal action, without success, to block its belated release in 1982, it is esteemed by jazz connoisseurs today.

Appearances on “Saturday Night Live” and other television shows raised his profile, as did extensive touring. In 1981 he had his biggest hit with the song “We’re in This Love Together,” which reached No. 15 on the Billboard pop singles chart.

He won his first Grammy in 1978, for best jazz vocal performance, for his album “Look to the Rainbow.” He won his last in 2007, for best traditional R&B vocal performance; the award was shared by Mr. Jarreau, George Benson and Jill Scott for their collaborative performance “God Bless the Child.”

In between, in 1982, Mr. Jarreau earned a Grammy for best pop vocal performance by a male artist for the title track of his album “Breakin’ Away.” That year, he also received the Grammy for best jazz vocal performance by a male artist, for his version of Dave Brubeck’s “Blue Rondo à la Turk,” from the same album.

His other Grammys came in 1979 for the album “All Fly Home” (in the jazz category), and in 1993 for the album “Heaven and Earth” (in R&B). A seventh Grammy came in 1981 for “In Harmony: A Sesame Street Record,” a compilation children’s album that featured a range of artists.

Among Mr. Jarreau’s best-known recordings was the theme song for the long-running television series “Moonlighting,” for which he wrote the lyrics to Lee Holdridge’s music. He appeared on Broadway as a replacement in the role of the Teen Angel in the 1994 revival of “Grease.”

Mr. Jarreau’s first marriage, to Phyllis Hall, ended in divorce. He is survived by his wife, the former Susan Player; a son, Ryan; two brothers, Marshall and Appie; and a sister, Rose Marie Freeman.

Mr. Jarreau canceled a number of concert dates in 2010 after experiencing heart and breathing problems during a European tour. He was hospitalized for 11 days but resumed his touring schedule after his release, and had continued to perform until recently.

Shortly after his 2010 hospitalization, he said in an interview that his health problems had not been as serious as reports suggested, but joked that he appreciated the attention they received in the media because it proved that he was a celebrity. “I figured,” he said, “‘Yeah, maybe I have arrived.’”


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